Emergency Preparedness

///Emergency Preparedness
Emergency Preparedness2019-05-16T19:19:09+00:00

Emergency Response Plan

As part of the Town of Kindersley’s commitment to the safety and well-being of its residents, the Emergency Measures Organization (EMO) Emergency Response Plan was created to assess the potential hazards that are most likely to impact the community or region at large. This plan is modified on an ongoing basis to ensure the most up to date resources and agencies are actively involved in the implementation of the plan should an emergency arise.

According to the Emergency Response Plan, the Town of Kindersley has experienced or is most likely to experience the following emergencies:

  1. Tornado/Windstorm
  2. Snow/Ice
  3. Chemical spill or Dangerous Goods accident on the highway or railway
  4. Long-term Power Failure
  5. Pandemic/Epidemic occurrence
  6. Fire – wild fire/structural/explosion

The chemical spill or dangerous goods accident involving an evacuation of all or a portion of the Town was deemed to have the greatest overall impact on the community and surrounding area.

The Emergency Response Plan involves consultation between the Town of Kindersley, RM of Kindersley, emergency response agencies (i.e. RCMP, EMS, Kindersley Fire and Rescue Brigade), Heartland Health Region, crisis and emergency support agencies, and several other important partners. Surrounding communities committed to providing mutual aid in the case of a major incident or emergency are also consulted on an ongoing basis as the plan is updated and modified.

The Town of Kindersley’s EMO Coordinator facilitates the plan and act as liaison between all the partners and agencies involved.

Swimming Alone

Children under 7 or non-swimmers who cannot pass the “swim test” must be within arms reach of a responsible caregiver, an adult or youth who is a proficient swimmer. The “swim test” is being able to swim 12 metres (width of the Jr. Olympic Pool) with a recognizable stroke. This is up to the Lifeguards discretion whether or not the non-swimmer passes the test.

Emergency Preparedness Kit

An emergency kit may include, but is not limited to the following:

  • Water- 2L per person per day
  • Non- perishable foods
  • Manual can opener
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Battery-powered or wind-up radio
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Special needs items- may include:
    • Medications,
    • Copies of important documents (birth certificate, passport, etc.)
    • Extra keys for your car and house
    • Cash
    • Family emergency plan

Swimming Alone

Children under 7 or non-swimmers who cannot pass the “swim test” must be within arms reach of a responsible caregiver, an adult or youth who is a proficient swimmer. The “swim test” is being able to swim 12 metres (width of the Jr. Olympic Pool) with a recognizable stroke. This is up to the Lifeguards discretion whether or not the non-swimmer passes the test.

Safety Tips for the Family

Creating and memorizing a Family Emergency Plan will help prevent chaos and mitigate greater risk to your loved ones during an emergency. A Family Emergency Plan should include instructions on meeting places outside of the home in the event of separation during an emergency event.

Three steps to follow if you’re at home during an emergency event:

  1. Move indoors, if outside, and gather all family members in one room.
  2. Gather your family emergency kit and move into a safe room.
  3. Turn on a radio and await further instruction from emergency personnel.

Elmer the Safety Elephant

Emergency preparedness begins at home. Using fun activities to explain practical information, parents can teach their children important safety lessons that will help keep them safe from all kinds of hazards both at home and outside in the community.

Elmer the Safety Elephant is the mascot of the Canada Safety Council. Visit www.elmer.ca for a wealth of online games and activities that teach kids valuable safety skills.

For more information about Emergency Preparedness visit http://www.getprepared.gc.ca/index-en.aspx

Swimming Alone

Children under 7 or non-swimmers who cannot pass the “swim test” must be within arms reach of a responsible caregiver, an adult or youth who is a proficient swimmer. The “swim test” is being able to swim 12 metres (width of the Jr. Olympic Pool) with a recognizable stroke. This is up to the Lifeguards discretion whether or not the non-swimmer passes the test.

Are You Prepared? Take this quiz to find out

Swimming Alone

Children under 7 or non-swimmers who cannot pass the “swim test” must be within arms reach of a responsible caregiver, an adult or youth who is a proficient swimmer. The “swim test” is being able to swim 12 metres (width of the Jr. Olympic Pool) with a recognizable stroke. This is up to the Lifeguards discretion whether or not the non-swimmer passes the test.

See Also:

Emergency Measures Organization Bylaw
Basic Emergency Supply Kit Example
Make an emergency plan
Spring Flooding Prevention Tips
Emergency Preparedness Guide Download

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